Monthly Archives: March 2015

Coconut Oil to Reduce Cholesterol and Dementia?

A few years ago, Dr. Mary Newport’s discovery of using coconut oil to reverse her husbands advanced Alzheimer’s disease made a big splash in the alternative health media. Some of this splash managed to wet a few pages of the mainstream media (MSM), and Dr. Newport wrote a book about her discovery for hubby’s turn-around called Alzheimer’s Disease: What If There Was a Cure?: The Story of Ketones.

Meanwhile, others who were showing early signs of dementia or worse picked up the news with the same attitude Mary had, “what do we have to lose? Thus a movement toward using saturated fat coconut oil for dementia prevention and reversal was spawned with mostly successes.

Actually, the use of high saturated fat diets to create ketones was created by Johns Hopkins Medical Center in the 1920’s.  Ketones are processed easily to provide fuel for brain cells when carbohydrate metabolism fails within the brain. But a few decades later, the medical mafia decided that saturated fats are bad and cholesterol, especially LDL, the “bad cholesterol”, just had to go in order to prevent obesity and heart disease.

Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are on the rise, with over 5 million people suffering from the disease in the U.S. It is costing the country $148 billion annually.  While we tend not to worry about diseases that occur much later in life, knowing how to prevent and treat Alzheimer’s is essential. Lifestyle choices such as diet can help prevent the disease, with some research pointing to the relationship between coconut oil and Alzheimer’s – and how this oil can help prevent and reverse the problem.

Big Pharma was not on Steve Newport’s side when he began experiencing progressive dementia at age 53 and later diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Doctors put Mr. Newport on Alzheimer’s drugs. Eventually, Mr. Newport could neither remember how to get water out of the refrigerator nor draw the face of a clock.

Rather than pursue the fruitless path paved by pharmaceutical companies, his wife Mary Newport, MD, began researching Alzheimer’s itself. She found that ketones provide an alternative energy source for brain cells when they have trouble using glucose as they do in patients with dementia. The body naturally produces ketones in the absence of carbohydrates, but rather than put Mr. Newport on a strict diet, Dr. Newport simply had her husband take 20 grams (about 4 teaspoons) of coconut oil a day.

By then, Dr. Newport had learned of a promising drug trial for dementia. Humorously, the drug was created using a non-patentable natural substance, medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) derived from coconut or palm, since the synthetic drugs are failing – this is the drug Dr. Newport was going for.

According to recent research, when the body metabolizes MCT oil, it forms ketones that may protect against and even reverse Alzheimer’s. This is true for Parkinson’s and Hungtington’s disease; multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease; drug-resistant epilepsy; brittle type I diabetes; and type II diabetes, as well. But Mr. Newport was unable to get into the drug trial, so he began taking coconut oil twice daily.

Reported by the Alliance for Natural Health:

“At this point, he could barely remember how to draw a clock. Two weeks after adding coconut oil to his diet, his drawing improved. After 37 days, Steve’s drawing gained even more clarity. The oil seemed to “lift the fog…every morning he was alert and happy, talkative, making jokes…He was able to concentrate on things that he wanted to do around the house and in the yard and stay on task, whereas before coconut oil he was easily distractible and rarely accomplished anything unless he was directly supervised.”

Over the course of a year, his dementia reversed itself. He was able to run again, his reading comprehension improve dramatically, and memory improved. An MRI proved his brain atrophy had completely stopped.

Dr. Newport’s finding on the relationship between coconut oil and Alzheimer’s saved more than one life. If word of her study spreads, it could help millions of degenerative disease patients reverse their conditions more effectively and more frugally than with pharmaceuticals. The drug trial Dr. Newport had examined used a coconut oil-based drug, but its effects still only lasted 3 hours compared to the 8 hours from moderately-priced, non-hydrogenated, store-bought coconut oil.

This isn’t the first time natural methods have been shown to be more effective than pharmaceuticals at preventing dementia. While knowing the coconut oil and Alzheimer’s connection can prove extremely useful, Dr. Robert Williams of Kings College in London has advocated the potential benefits of vegetables- and fruits-sourced flavonoids. Many foods—like omega-3 fatty acids found in fish, anthocyanin in berries, greens, and nuts improve memory and general brain performance.

Why Is Confidence So Attractive?

Confidence seems to be the one thing that most people find extremely attractive. But what is it about confidence that makes it so sexy? Why are we more likely to be drawn to someone who is confident than to someone who is insecure or needy?

Confident people are noticeable, they stand out. They have a certain air about them that makes you want to get to know them. You want to know what makes them so self-assured. They’re intriguing and we’re beguiled.

Someone who knows how to do something well and owns that ability.  They’re typically comfortable in their own skin and well-adjusted. They have a sense of ease which is also quite appealing.  Confident people seem to know what they want and are not afraid to ask for it or go after it. Nor are they afraid to express themselves and they don’t try to come across as something they’re not.

Remember that quiet confidence should not to be confused with outright arrogance, which is based in insecurity.  When someone feels the need to boast, they actually lack confidence and subconsciously need to fill that gap in themselves with others’ validation.  People who lack confidence are generally insecure. They’re often apprehensive and anxious. Many need constant reassurance and attention and take a great deal of energy.