Category Archives: Anti-Aging

Fillers and Botox: What’s the Difference?

fillers and botox

The Powerful Influencing Effect of People’s Faces On Other’s Behavior

Beautiful-Baby-Face-Photo

A picture may be worth 1,000 words, but what a face can do is apparently priceless.  Princeton researchers discovered that people might make fast, subconscious decisions based solely on appearance at times when it was thought the decisions were based on more rational measures.

 In this case, participants in the study were asked to choose which political candidate seemed most competent by looking only at their picture.  The people were able to predict the outcome of nearly 72 percent of three U.S. Senate races based only on this visual information.

“The findings are striking—I didn’t believe them at first,” said Alexander Todorov, assistant professor of psychology and public affairs.  “I think that a lot of inferences that we make about other people are fairly automatic and can even occur outside of conscious awareness.  The catch is that these inferences can influence important deliberate decisions.”

From Birth on We Make Decisions Based on Appearance

One study found that, within the first 3 to 6 months of life, a baby established a preference for “attractive” people.  They look at attractive faces longer than unattractive faces during this age span, then, when they reach 1 year, begin to show a more positive response to attractive people than unattractive people.

Further, studies have shown that very young children make choices about who they’d like to play with based on facial attractiveness and body form.  Evidence has even been found that physical attractiveness influences social acceptance among children in nursery school.

But kids are not the only ones with such views.  In a study in which 400 teachers analyzed the same school records for two children (one attractive and one unattractive), the teachers gave higher ratings of education potential to the attractive children.

Is Beauty Really in the Eye of the Beholder?

A review of literature on the effect of facial attractiveness from 1932 to 1999, published in the Psychological Bulletin, found that beauty is, in fact, NOT in the eye of the beholder.  It was found that most people agree about who is or is not attractive (within and across ethnicities), and there may be universal standards by which attractiveness is judged.

Plus, that old saying ‘don’t judge a book by its cover’ seems to go largely ignored.  Adults and children considered attractive were judged more favorably and treated more positively than their unattractive counterparts, even by those who knew them.

Moms Even Judge Their Babies

Beautiful-Baby-Face-Photo

Surprisingly, according to the Langlois Social Development Lab, mothers appear to be more affectionate toward and play more with their infants if they’re attractive, compared to those who were less attractive.

Plus, mothers of less attractive infants rated them as more of a disruption to their lives than mothers of attractive infants.  Although none of the mothers treated their infants badly, attractiveness did influence even maternal behavior.

What Makes a Face Attractive?

There are several theories out there as to what actually makes a face attractive.  Some researchers believe that youthfulness, a smile or a symmetrical face all play a role.  And, according to Langlois Social Development Lab, a face must be “close to population mean” to be considered attractive.  In other words, it must be average.

Are We All That Superficial?

What does all this mean in the real world?  Are we all just superficial beings wrapped up in judging one another on our looks?  Not really.  Many researchers suggest that these preferences are ingrained in us, and that we may prefer an attractive person in choosing a mate because we believe attractiveness on the outside may also be a sign of a healthy inside (and thus a more reliable mate).

Or, as in the case of the first study, the participants made subconscious decisions based on the photos—they probably would have a hard time describing why they felt one candidate looked more competent than the other, it was almost an instinctual decision.

Most important when it comes to yourself and your face – facial expressions are a reflection of how you feel and what makes you happiest.  Repetitive movements become creases, such as frowning, smiling, squinting, corners of the mouth turning down etc.  The eyes may be the windows to the soul, but the expression on your face records each of your fleeting emotional states. As feelings of worry, excitement, and positivity pass through your mind, they tell your facial muscles how to respond. People with a good poker face can hide those feelings, but for the average person, there’s some leakage.

What about when people’s faces are at rest? What can you infer then about their feelings? Perhaps you’ve caught yourself inadvertently in the mirror or the reflection of a window when you were in the middle of a thoughtful, contemplative episode. Were you surprised to see that you looked angry, when you weren’t?

This common situation of catching a glimpse of yourself while at rest and looking angry has inspired the term, for women, “Resting Bitch Face”.

According to the RBF theory, if a woman is caught in contemplation (i.e., not smiling), people are more likely to think she’s angry than if a man shows the exact same facial expression. A woman who doesn’t smile is assumed to be in a bad mood because, so the theory goes, women are expected to smile at all times. Through cultural conditioning, women have learned that in order for people to like them, they have to wear a smile even if they don’t think anything is particularly funny. Men who look thoughtful are seen as serious; women with the same expression are perceived as unfriendly and unlikeable.

 

They say survival of the fittest, thats not true… it is survival of the adaptable.

Screen Shot 2016-07-19 at 5.19.32 PMIt’s likely that you’ve heard about the detrimental effects of the stress hormone cortisol. Elevated cortisol levels and chronic stress can affect every physiological system in your body, including your thyroid and adrenal glands. It can make you anxious and irritable, lead to weight gain and bone loss, contribute to diabetes and heart disease risk, and deplete your energy levels.

Cortisol is also known as the aging hormone. When cortisol gets too high, it puts you into a “fight or flight” response, which stimulates your sympathetic nervous system and your adrenal glands. When this occurs, there is a decrease in your digestive secretions and an increase in blood pressure. This puts your body in a state of constant stress, which will burn out your adrenal glands, stress your digestive tract and cause you to age more rapidly.

So if you want to look younger, feel younger and be healthy — and heal adrenal fatigue — you must get your cortisol levels balanced.Side effects of chronically elevated cortisol can include:

  • Anxiety
  • Autoimmune diseases
  • Cancer
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Common Colds
  • Hormone imbalance
  • Irritable bowel disease
  • Thyroid conditions
  • Weight loss resistance

So what can help us adapt to stress and lower cortisol? Adaptogens …

 

What Are Adaptogens?

Phytotherapy refers to the use of plants for their healing abilities. Adaptogens are a unique class of healing plants: They help balance, restore and protect the body. As naturopath Edward Wallace explains, an adaptogen doesn’t have a specific action: It helps you respond to any influence or stressor, normalizing your physiological functions. (1)

Naturopath Marcelle Pick of Women to Women reports that adaptogenic herbs can recharge your adrenal glands, helping you to respond to stress. (2) Adaptogens include ashwaganda, astragalus, ginseng, licorice root, holy basil, some mushrooms and rhodiola. According to Jan Whiticomb, there are 16 proven adaptogenic herbs.

Top 7 Adaptogen Herbs

1. Ginseng is the most well-known adaptogen, and Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) is considered the most potent. According to Wallace, research has validated Asian ginseng’s use for improving mental performance and your ability to withstand stress. This red ginseng also has antioxidant effects, antidepressant effects, and can help naturally lower blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

There are a number of adaptogens referred to as ginsengs that aren’t technically ginsengs, but keep in mind that they have similar composition or effects.

2. Holy basil also called tulsi, holy basil is known in India as the “elixir of anti-aging.” Preliminary studies suggest that holy basil benefits include helping you fight fatigue and stress; boost your immune system; and regulate blood sugar, blood pressure and hormone levels.

3. Ashwaganda is often referred to as Indian ginseng. Often used in Ayurvedic medicine, ashwaganda regulates the immune system and eases anxiety. Ashwaganda has been used in Eastern medicine for over 2,500 years and has immuno-modulating effects that boost your immune system and aid the body in lowering cortisol levels.

 

4. Astragalus root is used in Chinese medicine, astragalus boosts immunity and buffers the effects of stress. It increases the amount of anti-stress compounds our bodies use to repair and prevent stress-related damage. It may also reduce the ability of stress hormones like cortisol to bind to receptors.

5. Licorice root can increase energy and endurance, boost the immune system, and protect the thymus from being damaged by cortisol, but its use requires professional supervision because of how it may affect blood pressure.

6. Rhodiola (rhodiola rosea), or golden root, is a potent adaptogen that has been the focus of much research. Rhodiola provides a buffer to stress-related mental and physical fatigue. According to Whiticomb, Rhodiola was used by Russian cosmonauts, athletes and military personnel, and years of study have begun to uncover the very mechanisms by which it acts as an adaptogen.

Rhodiola rosea contains a phytochemical known as salisdroside. This component helps relieve anxiety and combat aging. Rhodiola suppresses the production of cortisol and increases levels of stress-resistant proteins.

Studies have found that it restores normal patterns of eating and sleeping after stress; lowers mental and physical fatigue; and protects against oxidative stress, heat stress, radiation and exposure to toxic chemicals. Rhodiola also protects the heart and liver, increases use of oxygen, improves memory, and may even extend longevity. Also, new research proves it’s effective as a weight loss agent.

7. Cordycep mushrooms reishi, shiitake and maitake mushrooms are funguses with antioxidant properties. That means nutrition-rich mushrooms have all the benefits of antioxidant foods. They may not be adaptogens in the classic sense, but each has adaptogenic, anti-tumor and immune-enhancing properties.

Eating well, getting proper rest, staying active, writing down what you’re grateful for and maintaining social connection all help protect you from chronic stress, which can kill your quality of life. Adding adaptogens to your routine can make you even more resilient to the damaging effects of high cortisol levels.

 

 

 

Do We Instinctually Favor Beautiful People

A picture may be worth a 1,000 words, but what a face can do is apparently priceless.  Princeton researchers discovered that people might make fast, subconscious decisions based solely on appearance at times when it was thought the decisions were based on more rational measures.

In this case, participants in the study were asked to choose which political candidate seemed most competent by looking only at their picture.  The people were able to predict the outcome of nearly 72 percent of three U.S. Senate races based only on this visual information.

The findings are striking—I didn’t believe them at first,” said Alexander Todorov, assistant professor of psychology and public affairs.  “I think that a lot of inferences that we make about other people are fairly automatic and can even occur outside of conscious awareness.  The catch is that these inferences can influence important deliberate decisions.”

From Birth on We Make Decisions Based on Appearance

One study found that, within the first 3 to 6 months of life, a baby established a preference for “attractive” people.  They look at attractive faces longer than unattractive faces during this age span, then, when they reach 1 year, begin to show a more positive response to attractive people than unattractive people.

Further studies have shown that very young children make choices about who they’d like to play with based on facial attractiveness and body form.  Evidence has even been found that physical attractiveness influences social acceptance among children in nursery school.

But kids are not the only ones with such views.  In a study in which 400 teachers analyzed the same school records for two children (one attractive and one unattractive), the teachers gave higher ratings of education potential to the attractive children.

Is Beauty Really in the Eye of the Beholder?

A review of the literature on the effects of facial attractiveness from 1932 to 1989, published in the Psychological Bulletin, found that beauty is, in fact, NOT in the eye of the beholder.  It was found that most people agree about who is or is not attractive (within and across ethnicities), and there may be universal standards by which attractiveness is judged.

Plus, that old saying, ‘don’t judge a book by its cover’ seems to go largely ignored.  Adults and children considered attractive were judged more favorably and treated more positively than their unattractive counterparts, even by those who knew them.

 

Moms Even Judge Their Babies

Surprisingly, according to the Langlois Social Development Lab, mothers appear to be more affectionate toward and play more with their infants if they’re attractive, compared to those who were less attractive.

Plus, mothers of less attractive infants rated them as more disruption to their lives than mothers of attractive infants.  Although none of the mothers treated their infants badly, attractiveness did influence even maternal behavior.

Are We All That Superficial?

What does all this mean in the real world?  Are we all just superficial beings wrapped up in judging one another on our looks?  Not really. Many researchers suggest that these preferences are ingrained in us, and that we may prefer an attractive person in choosing a mate because we believe attractiveness on the outside may also be  assign of a healthy inside (and thus a more reliable mate).

Or, as in the case of the first study, the participants made subconscious decisions based on the photos—they probably would have a hard time describing why they felt one candidate looked more competent than the other, it was almost an instinctual decision.

Anti-Aging: Celebrity Tips for Aging Gracefully

There’s nothing less attractive than someone desperately clinging to the last remnants of their youth. We think it’s far sexier to be comfortable in your own skin and the key to Anti-Aging.

In the art of aging gracefully we are taking tips from the biggest post-50 heartthrob George Clooney.  He has spoken about the importance of embracing each extra candle on your birthday cake. “I’m a big believer in the idea that you can’t try to look younger. You just have to try to look the best you can at the age you are,” he said in a recent interview. And he has the salt-and-pepper hair to prove it.

Taking a leaf from Clooney’s book, here are some of the little things that people aging gracefully all have in common.

Anti-Aging tip #1  They work out to get strong, not skinny. 
Cardio is good but strength training is a must for anti-aging.  As early as in our 30’s, we start to lose muscle mass, up to 5 % per decade, if we don’t work to maintain and build it.  In fact, according to Ken Kim, an internal medicine specialist, after age 45 we lose 1 percent every year.  That can add up.  Strength and resistance training to build muscle not only counters that, it can help you stay strong and independent as you age so you can keep up with your day-to-day activities.

Anti-Aging tip #2   They stress less. 
Numerous studies have shown that stress, whether it’s from work or family, can cause aging on a cellular level–maybe even causing you to age a decade faster. On the outside, stress can cause sleepless nights (dark circles), skin dehydration and even hair loss in extreme cases.  You should take a moment and breathe, your golden years are to be enjoyed.

Anti-Aging tip #3   They’ve let go of regrets and grudges.

You can’t move on to the future when you’re stuck looking back at the past. Learn from your mistakes rather than replaying them in your head. As the Zen proverb says, “Let go or be dragged.”  You should consider meditating and start your morning with a cup of coffee and a little mindfulness to help you live in the moment.

Learning something new in your spare time is accessible to anyone with an internet connection

Anti-Aging tip #4   They learn something new every day. 
Yes, you can teach an old dog new tricks. Stay curious. Try something different. All of these things help break you out of your monotonous routine and can help you get out of a rut. Plus, learning something new can give you confidence.  One study showed that older adults who took up a new activity for 3 months showed considerable improvements in memory compared with those who only engaged in familiar activities.

Anti-Aging tip #5  They don’t overdo it with makeup

We’re all for dressing up and putting on a bit of makeup, but don’t be tempted to overdo it. The key is to enhance what you’ve got rather than piling on layers of foundation to cover up what you don’t like.  Too much makeup will end up looking mask-like and unnatural, sapping your natural glow and eventually settling in to and accentuating fine lines and wrinkles.

Anti-Aging tip #6 They stay positive.

You shouldn’t complain about old age. it won’t make you any younger. Instead, choosing positive thoughts can bring a number of benefits including better coping skills, a better immune system and even a longer life. Yes, that’s right. A study of nearly 100,000 women over 50 found that optimists had a 14% lower risk of death in the study follow-up and were 30 percent less likely to die from coronary heart disease than their pessimistic peers. Another study found that even in people with heart disease, those who stayed positive were 58% more likely to survive an an additional 5 years.  You will see your glass as half full.

Lack of sleep can cause you to gain weight and age faster

Anti-Aging tip #7   They get enough sleep.
It may be harder to fall asleep and stay asleep with age, but aim to make sleep a priority anyway. Sleep is one of the essentials of anti-aging.  You shouldn’t underestimate the power of sleep on your skin, hair, energy, balance, and mood, adding that eight hours and no less should be the goal. Make sure your bedroom is not a place for work or television a half hour before you should be asleep, and that it is well ventilated. At night it must be dark and quiet. Investing in a good mattress and pillows also matters. The French average nine hours of sleep a night — and that makes me smile.

Anti-Aging tip #8 They eat and drink to their health. 
The idea that you are what you eat is definitely true, especially as you age. You should get your vitamins from foods you eat rather than synthetic supplements. It’s never too late to beef up your diet with enriching foods to ward off further aging. Make sure you’re eating a rainbow of foods, rich especially in Vitamins A, C, E, D and K.  Taking a whole food supplement like Kyani super foods

Anti-Aging #9   They embrace their changing looks.

George Clooney has said he won’t be dyeing his hair anytime soon. He even added that going to such measures can sometimes make you look worse. We’re all for ditching the dye if you’re comfortable with it.  If you color your hair pick a soft natural color a little lighter than your natural color when you were young.  Dark colors are harsh.  Simple tricks like adding layers, bangs, and volume can completely transform your look.  There’s nothing more aging than rocking the same hairstyle you had in the 80’s.

Kyani For Health and Wellness

Skincare for Men

Men’s facial skin is typically thicker than women’s and less likely to be sensitive to ingredients in facial cleansers and moisturizers. Skincare is also usually a simpler routine since men typically don’t wear makeup.

However, shaving is another story. For men with heavy beards or curly or kinky hair, irritation and razor bumps can be a big problem. With proper face care, though, those hazards can be made a thing of the past and a clean, smooth face can become a welcome daily occurrence.

Bar soap tends to dry skin out more than liquid cleansers. If your skin feels tight or a little itchy after you wash your face, try switching to a liquid cleanser.

You may experience problems with acne if you have very oily skin. Acne is caused by excess oil production that clogs pores, causing inflammation.

Look for soaps or liquid cleansers that contain salicylic acid, glycolic acid, or benzyl peroxide. All three of these exfoliating agents remove the upper layers of dead skin and allow for deeper cleaning of pores. They also have antibacterial properties.

Lots of facial moisturizers promise to keep your face young, but not all of them deliver.  A lot of products these days tout the fact that they contain antioxidants,  Prescription-strength products with retinol (Retin-A) do smooth out fine lines and wrinkles and even reverse signs of aging at the cellular level.  However, the lower levels of retinol found in over-the-counter products may not be high enough to do much good. ZO Medical products have a few great options.

Retamax

Utilizing an innovative micro emulsion technology, this potent retinol, blended with plant stem cell antioxidants and bio-mimetic proteins, helps reverse the signs of aging and aids in the prevention of future damage.  Stimulating Collagen Formation and Skin Barrier Function  RETAMAX™ aids in skin rejuvenation by triggering the natural formation of collagen and encouraging the restoration of the skin barrier function by up-regulating the production of hyaluronic acid, the skin’s most vital natural hydrating factor.

Antioxidant Response  This biocellular antioxidant system serves to block free-radical damage, helps protect vulnerable cellular DNA, and addresses the root cause initiators of future skin aging. Optimizing inflammation management and anti-glycation irritation, RETAMAX™ helps ensure maintenance of the new, healthy skin state by defending against inflammatory-initiated skin damage.

RETAMAX™ Micro Emulsion System

  • High-potency vitamin A stimulates the skin’s natural rebuilding process
  • Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action with vitamins C and E, and buddleja plant stem cells
  • Biomimetic protein activation for skin regeneration
  • Micro emulsion technology supports rapid delivery of key ingredients

Advanced Night Repair, a lightweight, high potency retinol formula that targets multiple signs of aging skin while protecting against future skin aging and damage. Ossential Growth Factor Serum, a lightweight gel that strengthens skin, repairs aging skin, and protects against future signs of aging. Formulated for all skin types, even the most sensitive.

If your face gets irritated from shaving, try a shaving cream with aloe. Try lathering up with a little extra water and leave it on your face for a minute before you shave to soften beard hairs.  Pre-shaving oil is another solution. Applied several minutes before shaving, the oil helps moisturize skin and soften beard hairs.

  • For razor bumps, which are caused by ingrown hairs, look for a shaving cream that contains glycolic acid or salicylic acid, exfoliating agents that unplug pores. Look for hypoallergenic products without fragrance to avoid further irritating your skin.

More important than shaving oils or creams is the razor you use. Electric razors are less likely to irritate than blades. But if you prefer a blade, choose a single or double-bladed razor. Skip those multi-blade brands that promise the closest possible shave.  If you have trouble with razor burn and razor bumps, you don’t want a very close shave. It’s better to leave a little growth in order to avoid ingrown hairs.  Shave in the direction that hairs grow, not against the grain, which can cause more irritation.