Category Archives: cholesterol

They say survival of the fittest, thats not true… it is survival of the adaptable.

Screen Shot 2016-07-19 at 5.19.32 PMIt’s likely that you’ve heard about the detrimental effects of the stress hormone cortisol. Elevated cortisol levels and chronic stress can affect every physiological system in your body, including your thyroid and adrenal glands. It can make you anxious and irritable, lead to weight gain and bone loss, contribute to diabetes and heart disease risk, and deplete your energy levels.

Cortisol is also known as the aging hormone. When cortisol gets too high, it puts you into a “fight or flight” response, which stimulates your sympathetic nervous system and your adrenal glands. When this occurs, there is a decrease in your digestive secretions and an increase in blood pressure. This puts your body in a state of constant stress, which will burn out your adrenal glands, stress your digestive tract and cause you to age more rapidly.

So if you want to look younger, feel younger and be healthy — and heal adrenal fatigue — you must get your cortisol levels balanced.Side effects of chronically elevated cortisol can include:

  • Anxiety
  • Autoimmune diseases
  • Cancer
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Common Colds
  • Hormone imbalance
  • Irritable bowel disease
  • Thyroid conditions
  • Weight loss resistance

So what can help us adapt to stress and lower cortisol? Adaptogens …

 

What Are Adaptogens?

Phytotherapy refers to the use of plants for their healing abilities. Adaptogens are a unique class of healing plants: They help balance, restore and protect the body. As naturopath Edward Wallace explains, an adaptogen doesn’t have a specific action: It helps you respond to any influence or stressor, normalizing your physiological functions. (1)

Naturopath Marcelle Pick of Women to Women reports that adaptogenic herbs can recharge your adrenal glands, helping you to respond to stress. (2) Adaptogens include ashwaganda, astragalus, ginseng, licorice root, holy basil, some mushrooms and rhodiola. According to Jan Whiticomb, there are 16 proven adaptogenic herbs.

Top 7 Adaptogen Herbs

1. Ginseng is the most well-known adaptogen, and Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) is considered the most potent. According to Wallace, research has validated Asian ginseng’s use for improving mental performance and your ability to withstand stress. This red ginseng also has antioxidant effects, antidepressant effects, and can help naturally lower blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

There are a number of adaptogens referred to as ginsengs that aren’t technically ginsengs, but keep in mind that they have similar composition or effects.

2. Holy basil also called tulsi, holy basil is known in India as the “elixir of anti-aging.” Preliminary studies suggest that holy basil benefits include helping you fight fatigue and stress; boost your immune system; and regulate blood sugar, blood pressure and hormone levels.

3. Ashwaganda is often referred to as Indian ginseng. Often used in Ayurvedic medicine, ashwaganda regulates the immune system and eases anxiety. Ashwaganda has been used in Eastern medicine for over 2,500 years and has immuno-modulating effects that boost your immune system and aid the body in lowering cortisol levels.

 

4. Astragalus root is used in Chinese medicine, astragalus boosts immunity and buffers the effects of stress. It increases the amount of anti-stress compounds our bodies use to repair and prevent stress-related damage. It may also reduce the ability of stress hormones like cortisol to bind to receptors.

5. Licorice root can increase energy and endurance, boost the immune system, and protect the thymus from being damaged by cortisol, but its use requires professional supervision because of how it may affect blood pressure.

6. Rhodiola (rhodiola rosea), or golden root, is a potent adaptogen that has been the focus of much research. Rhodiola provides a buffer to stress-related mental and physical fatigue. According to Whiticomb, Rhodiola was used by Russian cosmonauts, athletes and military personnel, and years of study have begun to uncover the very mechanisms by which it acts as an adaptogen.

Rhodiola rosea contains a phytochemical known as salisdroside. This component helps relieve anxiety and combat aging. Rhodiola suppresses the production of cortisol and increases levels of stress-resistant proteins.

Studies have found that it restores normal patterns of eating and sleeping after stress; lowers mental and physical fatigue; and protects against oxidative stress, heat stress, radiation and exposure to toxic chemicals. Rhodiola also protects the heart and liver, increases use of oxygen, improves memory, and may even extend longevity. Also, new research proves it’s effective as a weight loss agent.

7. Cordycep mushrooms reishi, shiitake and maitake mushrooms are funguses with antioxidant properties. That means nutrition-rich mushrooms have all the benefits of antioxidant foods. They may not be adaptogens in the classic sense, but each has adaptogenic, anti-tumor and immune-enhancing properties.

Eating well, getting proper rest, staying active, writing down what you’re grateful for and maintaining social connection all help protect you from chronic stress, which can kill your quality of life. Adding adaptogens to your routine can make you even more resilient to the damaging effects of high cortisol levels.

 

 

 

Coconut Oil to treat Dementia and Alzheimer’s

Coconut oil to treat Dementia and Alzheimer’s?  Yes indeed, nature has an answer to almost everything. A few years ago, Dr. Mary Newport’s discovery of using coconut oil to reverse her husbands advanced Alzheimer’s disease made a big splash in the alternative health media. Some of this splash managed to wet a few pages of the mainstream media (MSM), and Dr. Newport wrote a book about her discovery for hubby’s turn-around called Alzheimer’s Disease: What If There Was a Cure?: The Story of Ketones.

Meanwhile, others who were showing early signs of dementia or worse picked up the news with the same attitude Mary had, “what do we have to lose? Thus a movement toward using saturated fat coconut oil to treat dementia and Alzheimer’s for prevention and reversal was spawned with mostly successes.

Actually, the use of high saturated fat diets to create ketones was created by Johns Hopkins Medical Center in the 1920’s.

Ketones are processed easily to provide fuel for brain cells when carbohydrate metabolism fails within the brain. But a few decades later, the medical mafia decided that saturated fats are bad and cholesterol, especially LDL, the “bad cholesterol”, just had to go in order to prevent obesity and heart disease.

Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are on the rise, with over 5 million people suffering from the disease in the U.S. It is costing the country $148 billion annually.  While we tend not to worry about diseases that occur much later in life, knowing how to prevent and treat Alzheimer’s is essential. Lifestyle choices such as diet can help prevent the disease, by using coconut oil to treat dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Using coconut oil to treat Demensia and Alzheimer’s-  how to prevent and reverse the problem.

Big Pharma was not on Steve Newport’s side when he began experiencing progressive dementia at age 53 and later diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Doctors put Mr. Newport on Alzheimer’s drugs. Eventually, Mr. Newport could neither remember how to get water out of the refrigerator nor draw the face of a clock.

Rather than pursue the fruitless path paved by pharmaceutical companies, his wife Mary Newport, MD, began researching Alzheimer’s itself. She found that ketones provide an alternative energy source for brain cells when they have trouble using glucose as they do in patients with dementia. The body naturally produces ketones in the absence of carbohydrates, but rather than put Mr. Newport on a strict diet, Dr. Newport simply had her husband take 20 grams (about 4 teaspoons) of coconut oil a day.

Dr. Newport had learned of a promising drug trial for dementia. Humorously, the drug was created using a non-patentable natural substance, medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) derived from coconut or palm, since the synthetic drugs are failing – this is the drug Dr. Newport was going for.

According to recent research, when the body metabolizes MCT oil, it forms ketones that may protect against and even reverse Alzheimer’s. This is true for Parkinson’s and Hungtington’s disease; multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease; drug-resistant epilepsy; brittle type I diabetes; and type II diabetes, as well. But Mr. Newport was unable to get into the drug trial, so he began taking coconut oil twice daily.

Reported by the Alliance for Natural Health:

“At this point, he could barely remember how to draw a clock. Two weeks after adding coconut oil to his diet, his drawing improved. After 37 days, Steve’s drawing gained even more clarity. The oil seemed to “lift the fog…every morning he was alert and happy, talkative, making jokes…He was able to concentrate on things that he wanted to do around the house and in the yard and stay on task, whereas before coconut oil he was easily distractible and rarely accomplished anything unless he was directly supervised.”

Over the course of a year, his dementia reversed itself.

He was able to run again, his reading comprehension improve dramatically, and memory improved. An MRI proved his brain atrophy had completely stopped.

Dr. Newport’s finding on the relationship between coconut oil and Alzheimer’s saved more than one life. If word of her study spreads, it could help millions of degenerative disease patients reverse their conditions more effectively and more frugally than with pharmaceuticals. The drug trial Dr. Newport had examined used a coconut oil-based drug, but its effects still only lasted 3 hours compared to the 8 hours from moderately-priced, non-hydrogenated, store-bought coconut oil.

This isn’t the first time natural methods have been shown to be more effective than pharmaceuticals at preventing dementia. While knowing the coconut oil and Alzheimer’s connection can prove extremely useful, Dr. Robert Williams of Kings College in London has advocated the potential benefits of vegetables- and fruits-sourced flavonoids. Many foods—like omega-3 fatty acids found in fish, anthocyanin in berries, greens, and nuts improve memory and general brain performance.