Category Archives: Skin Care

skin care, creams, lotions, potions

7 Mistakes That Are Making You Break Out

1.SMART PHONES, HATS/CAPS, EYEWEAR

There’s a lot of gunk lurking on smartphone screens, eyeglasses, and the lining of your favorite hat: oil, makeup, and the residue of old hair products. All of that dirt and bacteria can quickly break you out,”

2.While the urge to go to town on a zit (especially when it appears many times its actual size in a magnifying mirror) can seem overwhelming, popping pimples only pushes bacteria further into the pore. So muster the strength to turn away—

3. There’s a difference between twice-weekly skin-brightening exfoliation (good), and daily obsessive overscrubbing (bad). That’s because the layers of our skin near the surface form a protective matrix of proteins and lipids that keep moisture in and acne-causing bacteria out. Aggressive scrubbing can impair the skin-barrier function and lead to inflammation. So think of that eager-beaver scouring as a means of exposing your skin to the very things that make it break out—and just don’t.

4. Splashing water on your face in the morning might seem like an adequate start to the day, since all that’s transpired since your last cleansing was a night of restful sleep on clean Egyptian cotton pillowcases. But you’d be surprised by how much settles on the face at night: Waste left from nighttime products and, if you had a glass of wine with dinner, the metabolized remains of alcohol. Wash your face before bed, at all costs, and repeat the process after you get up, since breakouts erupt when old makeup and your face’s natural oils meet pollutants and dirt during the day.

5. We all know that snack foods eventually end up on our hips and thighs. But tell a true beauty junkie that she’s also doing damage to her skin, and that should be enough to make her swear off sugar, white rice, and, well, everything nice. New evidence suggests that eating foods that cause blood sugar to spike—pizza, bagels, and cookies are all culprits—can trigger an avalanche of acne-generating hormones. Treat your skin to foods rich in vitamins A and E, like leafy greens, grapefruit, nuts, and avocado, which can help clear the complexion, and fiber, which slows the absorption of sugar into your system and reduces the risk of acne.

6. Indulging in alcohol doesn’t directly cause acne, although it has been blamed for turning skin blotchy, dry, and dull. It’s what accompanies alcohol in the glass that really brings on the breakouts. Ingredients like tonic water, fruit juice, syrups, and other sugary mixers are all offenders. (Remember what we said about sugary junk foods?) Stick with the basics at the bar (no sweetened mixed drinks ending in “toni”), match each round of booze with a glass of water (to combat dehydration), and consider a two-drink maximum as a worthy personal goal if you’re prone to pimples.

7. Skipping a shower after a workout may prolong the exercise induced euphoria, but wearing a damp sports bra or t shirt against your skin will form the perfect breeding ground for body acne, since the moist material pushes bacteria into sebum glands, producing zits. So wash your face and then change into clean, dry clothes. Also, if you’re still rocking your middle-school T-shirts and faded black stretch pants (the ones with the totally shot elastic waistband), consider a wardrobe overhaul: Invest in breathable designs made from moisture-wicking, fast-drying fabrics.

Looking out for your best interest-Procedures to avoid in the summer months

At Skin Technology, we are in the business of making you look your best year round. We offer a variety of procedures for individuals, but we serve our patient’s best interests first. Keeping that philosophy in mind, below are a list of procedures that we suggest you AVOID booking during the summer months.
Photo Facials: While they are excellent for acne scars and improving collagen, photo-facials run a risk of hyper-pigmentation exacerbated by sun exposure. Unless you are religious about reapplying your sun screen save this procedure for the winter
months!
Leg Vein Treatments: The risk of increased vein damage can occur when you combine sun exposure with leg vein treatments. In addition, the required post treatment compression garments can be uncomfortable to wear in very hot weather.
Laser Hair Removal (not offered at our facility): Of course smooth legs and skin would be fantastic for the summer, but with the time required between appointments for re-growth, laser hair removal can be difficult cosmetically in the summer when short skirts and dresses are the outfit of choice. We suggest that you keep to your traditional hair removal routine and save laser hair for the winter months.
Skin Technology strives to give you the best advice and treatment options for protecting your skin in the long run. In our next blog post, we will discuss treatments that are safe for the summer months and beyond.
If you have any questions or would like to make an appointment, please call us at 972-869-6900 or visit us on the web at www.skintechnologyinc.com

Cystic Acne… how to clear it up

If you have it, you likely know it. Cystic acne not only causes deep-seated scars on your face, but internal scars as well since many who have the skin disorder suffer from emotional distress. In fact “it is associated with long-term psychological issues including low self-esteem and depression.

However, there is no reason to throw in the towel. There are treatment options available and it is possible to get rid of cystic acne for good. You just have to know the right techniques. First it’s important to know that while cystic acne is a type of acne, it can’t be treated in the same way as blackheads and whiteheads. “[It] affects deeper skin tissue than common acne.

So while regular acne can be managed with topical medications, cystic acne can not. Due to the fact that cystic acne is usually a result of hormones, birth control pills are often recommended by dermatologists as a way to fight the problem. Other internal medication can be used as well. Antibiotics help to kill bacteria and reduce inflammation.

Isotretinoin, the active ingredient in the drugs Accutane and Claravis, is also typically prescribed for patients suffering from this type of acne. Your doctor may also treat it with procedures that can be performed during an office visit.

Lasers and other light therapies: These devices reduce the p. acne bacteria (the cause of acne). Your skin care specialist can determine whether this type of treatment can be helpful.

Chemical peels: chemical peels to treat 2 types of acne—blackheads and papules.

Acne removal: This procedure helps when the cyst does not respond to medicine. It also helps ease the pain and the chance that the cyst will leave a scar. If you absolutely have to get rid of a cyst quickly, your doctor may inject the cyst with medicine.

If you’re at home and have a painful cyst, but can’t get to your doctors office right away, apply a hot compress on your cystic acne. “The heat will help to pull pus out from beneath the skin’s surface. It will also reduce swelling and help your cystic acne to be less noticeable. You can simply soak a washcloth in hot water and hold it on the affected area for approximately 10 minutes,” she says.

Remember, when dealing with this type of acne, you have options, so visit your skin care specialist and keep up the good fight.

Winter Skin Tips

Winter Skin Care Tips

For many people, the cold clear days of winter bring more than just a rosy glow to the cheeks. They also bring uncomfortable dryness to the skin of the face, hands, and feet. For some people, the problem is worse than just a general tight, dry feeling: They get skin so dry it results in flaking, cracking, even eczema (in which the skin becomes inflamed).

“As soon as you turn the heat on indoors, the skin starts to dry out,” Bonnie LaPlante, an esthetician with the Canyon Ranch resort in Lenox, Mass., tells WebMD. “It doesn’t matter if you heat your home using oil, wood, or electricity. The skin gets dry.”

Sound familiar? Read on to get WebMD’s top 10 tips for boosting your winter skin care regimen, so that your skin stays moist and healthy through the winter months.

1. Seek a Specialist

If you go to your local drugstore, you’ll be hard put to find a salesperson who can give you good advice. That’s why going to an esthetician or dermatologist even once is a good investment. Such a specialist can analyze your skin type, troubleshoot your current skin care regimen, and give you advice on the skin care products you should be using.

But that doesn’t mean you’ll be stuck buying high-end products. “Inexpensive products work just as well as high-end ones,” says David Voron, MD, a dermatologist in Arcadia, Calif. “In fact, the extra price you pay for the expensive stuff is often just for packaging and marketing. What’s most important is how your skin responds to the product — and how you like its feel, not how much money you paid for it.”

2. Moisturize More

You may have found a moisturizer that works just fine in spring and summer. But as weather conditions change, so, too, should your skin care routine. Find an “ointment” moisturizer that’s oil-based, rather than water-based, as the oil will create a protective layer on the skin that retains more moisture than a cream or lotion. (Hint: Many lotions labeled as “night creams” are oil-based.)

But choose your oils with care because not all oils are appropriate for the face. Instead, look for “nonclogging” oils, like avocado oil, mineral oil, primrose oil, or almond oil. Shea oil — or butter — is controversial, because it can clog facial pores. And vegetable shortening, LaPlante says, is a really bad idea. “It would just sit on the skin,” she says. “And it would be really greasy.”

You can also look for lotions containing “humectants,” a class of substances (including glycerine, sorbitol, and alpha-hydroxy acids) that attract moisture to your skin.

3. Slather on the Sunscreen

No, sunscreen isn’t just for summertime. Winter sun — combined with snow glare — can still damage your skin. Try applying a broad-spectrum sunscreen to your face and your hands (if they’re exposed) about 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply frequently if you stay outside a long time.

4. Give Your Hands a Hand

The skin on your hands is thinner than on most parts of the body and has fewer oil glands. That means it’s harder to keep your hands moist, especially in cold, dry weather. This can lead to itchiness and cracking. Wear gloves when you go outside; if you need to wear wool to keep your hands warm, slip on a thin cotton glove first, to avoid any irritation the wool might cause.

5. Avoid Wet Gloves and Socks

Wet socks and gloves can irritate your skin and cause itching, cracking, sores, or even a flare-up of eczema.

6. Hook Up the Humidifier

Central heating systems (as well as space heaters) blast hot dry air throughout our homes and offices. Humidifiers get more moisture in the air, which helps prevent your skin from drying out. Place several small humidifiers throughout your home; they help disperse the moisture more evenly.

7. Hydrate for Your Health, Not for Your Skin

If you’ve heard it once, you’ve heard it a thousand times: Drinking water helps your skin stay young looking. In fact, it’s a myth. Water is good for your overall health and “the skin of someone who is severely dehydrated will benefit from fluids. But the average person’s skin does not reflect the amount of water being drunk,” Kenneth Bielinski, MD, a dermatologist in Oak Lawn, Ill., tells WebMD “It’s a very common misconception.”

LaPlante agrees. “I see clients at the spa who drink their 10 to 12 glasses of water a day and still have superdry skin. It just doesn’t do that much.”

8. Grease Up Your Feet

Yes, those minty foot lotions are lovely in the hot summer months, but during the winter, your feet need stronger stuff. Try finding lotions that contain petroleum jelly or glycerine instead. And use exfoliants to get the dead skin off periodically; that helps any moisturizers you use to sink in faster and deeper.

9. Pace the Peels

If your facial skin is uncomfortably dry, avoid using harsh peels, masks, and alcohol-based toners or astringents, all of which can strip vital oil from your skin. Instead, find a cleansing milk or mild foaming cleanser, a toner with no alcohol, and masks that are “deeply hydrating,” rather than clay-based, which tends to draw moisture out of the face. And use them a little less often.

10. Ban Superhot Baths

Sure, soaking in a burning-hot bath feels great after frolicking out in the cold. But the intense heat of a hot shower or bath actually breaks down the lipid barriers in the skin, which can lead to a loss of moisture. “You’re better off with just warm water,” LaPlante advises, “and staying in the water a shorter amount of time.”

A lukewarm bath with oatmeal or baking soda, can help relieve skin that is so dry it has become itchy, Bielinski notes. So, too, can periodically reapplying your moisturizer. If those techniques don’t work, go see a dermatologist. “You may need a prescription lotion to combat the dry skin,” Bielinski says. “Or you may have a condition that isn’t simply dry skin and that requires different treatment.”